Five Tips for Keeping Your Pet’s Weight Loss Resolution

January 7, 2015

Since New Year’s has passed, I suspect many pet families are hard at work on their list of resolutions. Weight loss is a common human New Year’s resolution and since estimates of overweight and obese pets range from 25-40%, I suspect it is on the list of many pet families as well. If you have a Labrador Retriever, Beagle, Cocker Spaniel, Basset Hound, Dachshund or Sheltie, breeds at high risk for obesity, weight loss is probably perpetually on your to do list.

Here are my tips to help your pet keep its resolve when it comes to weight loss:

  1. Many pet owners don’t recognize chubbiness in their favorite furry friend. Have your veterinarian assess your pet’s body condition score. This will help determine if weight loss is necessary.

    weight loss for pets

    Pet Body Condition Score Chart

  2. Using your pet’s body condition score, decide how much weight loss is necessary and have your veterinarian calculate the number of calories required daily to attain that weight. Ask if a weight loss food would be nutritionally better than simply cutting back on the current daily portion.
  3. Determine how many calories are in each can, bag or box of your pet’s food and calculate exactly how many ounces, grams or portions of a can are required to meet your pet’s daily calorie allotment. Then feed that number of calories – no more, no less.
  4. Limit treats to 10% of the calculated daily calorie allotment AND include treats in the daily calorie total. Treats can look deceptively calorie free and help to pack on the pounds. A small Milk Bone biscuit contains 20 calories and a Bully Stix has up to 22 calories per inch. A six inch stick could be nearly 25% of your 30 pound dog’s calorie allotment for the day.
  5. Keep your pet active. Throw a ball. Use the laser pointer with your cat. Exercise with your pet. Scientific research has shown exercising your dog is good for those on both ends of the leash.

Here are more weight loss suggestions for pets.

Let’s clink our glasses of no calorie seltzer water to a healthy, happy and thinner 2015 for the whole family!


Veterinary Year in Review: 2014

December 31, 2014

The AMC Gives Not Just at Christmas, but All Year

December 24, 2014

For over 100 years, The Animal Medical Center has held fast to the mission of community service embraced by our founder, Ellin Prince Speyer. In 1910, Mrs. Speyer and her organization, the New York Women’s League for Animals, established a dispensary and out-patient clinic for all animals whose owners could not afford to pay for medical treatment. The clinic treated 6,028 animals in the first full year. To this day, in addition to caring for New York City pets 24/7, The Animal Medical Center continues to give back to the community.

AMC TO THE RESCUEAMC TO THE RESCUE
Because The AMC’s main mission lies in promoting the health and well-being of companion animals through advanced treatment, research and education, we recently created a new Community Fund, AMC TO THE RESCUE, to provide subsidized specialty care to animals currently cared for by rescue groups. Through AMC TO THE RESCUE, we have provided a means for needy animals to receive care from one of our 30 board certified veterinary specialists. Since its inception in 2013, 20 dogs, 15 cats and one rabbit have received medical care supported by AMC TO THE RESCUE, which has led to the adoption of many of these pets into a forever home. Without the specialty care provided by The AMC’s board certified ophthalmologist, neurologist, internist, dentist, cardiologist, soft tissue and orthopedic surgeons, these pets might be spending yet another holiday as homeless and unadoptable rescue animals.

AMC at the WKC showThe Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show
Veterinarians from The AMC volunteered their time to manage minor health issues and triage emergencies for the dogs competing at the 2014 Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show from the start of the First Annual Masters Agility Championship until the moment GCH After All Painting the Sky captured the 138th Westminster Kennel Club Best in Show. Our doctors happily donated their time and skills to ensure the health and welfare of these beautiful animals.

Animal Medical Center Doggy Dash at the NYC Triathlon
For the past seven years The Animal Medical Center has been the title sponsor of the Animal Medical Center Doggy Dash. Doggy Dash gives a runner and their best canine friend the chance to compete in tandem over a 5 mile course through Central Park, finishing at the NYC Triathlon finish line. Twenty-nine dogs and their human runners participated in 2014. To ensure the health and safety of the canine participants, seven AMC veterinarians and four licensed veterinary technicians volunteered to perform the pre-race health certification and monitor canine participants on the hot and steamy day of the race.

AMC trains first respondersEmergency Medical Training for NYC First Responders
A new program for 2014, involving AMC veterinary volunteers, was a canine first aid and critical care workshop for first responders. AMC veterinarians and technicians provided training using canine dummies and cadavers to teach such practices as venipuncture, catheter placement, intubation, CPR, oxygen administration, and treatment of dogs in shock. Thirty-two medical operations personnel, including men and women from the FBI, undercover agents, fire department EMTs, paramedics, physicians, and even an Air Force para-rescue jumper benefited from the expertise and time of AMC volunteer instructors.

Partnering with Angel On A Leash
The AMC and Angel On A Leash are both champions of the human-animal bond and its role in enhancing human health and quality of life, believing in the positive role of therapy dogs in health care facilities, schools, rehabilitation, hospice, extended care, correctional facilities, and crisis intervention. Because of our shared missions, The AMC and Angel On A Leash again worked together this past September on the Ronald McDonald House Family Fun Walk held in Carl Schurz Park.

Giving Tuesday
On #GivingTuesday, the global day dedicated to giving back, the staff of The AMC gave not of time, but of money when they participated in a raffle. The proceeds, nearly $1,000, were donated to SAVE – Seniors’ Animal Veterinary Effort – a community fund supporting pet care for New York City seniors’ pets.

The AMC wishes you and yours the best of the holiday season and a 2015 filled with healthy and happy pets.


What do Blood Tests Tell Your Veterinarian?

December 18, 2014

bloodwork vialsVeterinarians at The Animal Medical Center must say “Let’s send some blood to the lab” about 100 times a day. But what are we looking for in all those tubes of blood with the colorful stoppers?

CBC = Complete Blood Count
Your dog’s or cat’s blood contains at least four types of white blood cells, red blood cells and blood clotting cells, called platelets. A complete blood count analyzes what cells are present, how many cells of each type make up the blood sample, and identifies any unusual cells present. For example, the presence of increased numbers of immature white blood cells, called band neutrophils or bands for short, indicate a serious infection. Last week, one of my patients had an elevated total white blood cell count and 1,236 bands per microliter of blood; normal is less than 300. An abdominal ultrasound determined she had a gallbladder infection.

In addition to assessing the types and numbers of white blood cells, the CBC measures the number of red blood cells and several different features of them as well. A lack of red blood cells is called anemia, and too many red blood cells suggests a rare hematologic disorder called polycythemia. Size is a critical diagnostic feature of red blood cells – too big and we look for an increase in baby red blood cells responding to bleeding or anemia; too small and we worry about iron deficiency. The amount of hemoglobin (oxygen carrying protein) is measured as well. If there is too little hemoglobin, we worry about iron deficiency, and red blood cells are so smart they never synthesize too much hemoglobin. If the lab report indicates the hemoglobin is elevated, we scrutinize the sample for possible errors.

Chem Panel = Serum Biochemical Profile
The CBC looks at the whole blood sample in pretty much the same form as it circulates in the bloodstream. Serum is the liquid portion of the blood without the blood cells. Serum is produced in the lab by spinning the blood in a centrifuge and using a pipette to remove the liquid portion. The serum sample is used to run a serum biochemical profile, a series of 20 or so tests that come in a panel.

The chem panel can be divided up into several different organ systems. Some tests increase with liver disease like the alanine amino transferase, or bilirubin. When a patient has a kidney problem, we often see elevations in blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. Then there is a group of tests that analyzes the concentration of chemical elements like calcium, phosphorus, sodium, potassium and chloride in the blood. These analytes are important for cellular function and can be abnormal in a wide variety of diseases, like adrenal gland diseases, kidney disease and urinary blockage. Typically a chem panel includes measurement of the protein level in the blood. Protein is affected by a wide variety of conditions and is usually interpreted in concert with the other abnormalities found in the panel. Finally, the chem panel measures blood sugar when looking for diabetes or low blood sugar.

The Combination is Critical
Submission of a CBC and chem panel is so routine that it is test #1 in The AMC’s lab ordering system! When paired, these two tests become a powerful tool for veterinarians to assess the health of your pet or to direct further testing to identify the cause of your pet’s illness.

Fun Things Blood Tests Can Tell Us
Blood tests don’t only tell us about disease, but also can give us other little tidbits about your pet:

  • If you have a mixed breed dog, a blood test analyzing your dog’s DNA can tell you about his parents and what breeds are in his genetic makeup.
  • Avian specialists use a blood test to tell if your bird is a boy or girl.
  • A blood test can also be used to predict the birth of a litter of puppies. A rise in blood progesterone to 2-3 micrograms/ml occurs 63 to 65 days prior to whelping – the dog word for birth of puppies.

Bigger is Better and a Lid Doesn’t Matter When it Comes to Cat Bathrooms

December 10, 2014

kitten in litter boxWho among us doesn’t covet a nice bathroom? Our homes today have more bathrooms and larger, more elaborate bathrooms than ever before. According to houzz.com, the average bathroom remodel in New York City costs $32,000, and features granite counter tops, porcelain tile and high end fixtures. Our feline companions are no different. They express definite likes and dislikes when it comes to their litter box. Provide them with a substandard bathroom and they will refuse to use it and instead will use the corner of your dining room rug as their new and more spacious bathroom! In the feline world, this problem is so serious that a 2001 research study reported inappropriate elimination as a top reason cats are relinquished to animal shelters.

What cats care about in their litter box
Bigger boxes are better
In a study published earlier this year in the Journal of Veterinary Behavior, cats were offered the choice of using a standard size litter box or a large plastic box greater than 33 inches in length. The number of urine and fecal “deposits” in each box were recorded and compared. Results determined cats like litter boxes larger than the standard ones available in pet stores.

More boxes are preferable 
Litter box issues are more common in multi-cat households. To avoid competition and territorial behavior towards litter boxes, which leads to inappropriate urination, provide your cats with multiple litter boxes.

Stinky boxes are bad
Even if you scoop daily and completely change the litter weekly, that box can get stinky. Veterinarians tested cats use of litter sprayed with a commercially available litter box odor eliminator. Cats clearly found the sprayed boxes more attractive an preferred their use over unsprayed boxes.

What cats don’t care about in their litter box
Our mothers admonished us to close the lid of the toilet during their attempts to teach us manners. Cats don’t care about a lid on their litter box. A 2013 study of cats to determine their preference for a covered or uncovered litter box found no preference in the style of box in most cats, although as any cat owner will attest to, some persnickety cats did choose an uncovered box over a lidded one or vice versa.

Seems to me that cats should care about the type of litter in their box, but I couldn’t find any research to support that theory. One study did show, the longer cats scratched in the litter box, the less likely they were to inappropriately eliminate. Scientists interpreted that finding to mean lots of scratching at the litter means a cat likes the litter in their box and they will be less likely to eliminate on the dining room rug.

Cat bathroom remodeling tips
Thankfully, remodeling a feline bathroom is much less costly than remodeling your bathroom. First, feline behavior experts believe in simple math when it comes to the number of litter boxes: number of cats + 1 = the number of litter boxes you should have. You don’t like to wait in line to use the restroom, and clearly cats feel the same way. Second, when purchasing additional litter boxes, consider upgrading to a larger box, such as an under-the-bed box or gift wrap storage box without its lid.

Finally, cats fully believe that they are gods and that “cleanliness is next to godliness.” Research has shown that daily scooping of cat waste from the litter box and weekly litter changes can resolve urine spray behavior in cats.

Remember: inappropriate elimination may be a sign of illness, so check with your veterinarian if your cat suddenly stops using her litter box.


Holiday Gifts for Pets

December 3, 2014

Sharing Turkey Day Dinner with Your Pets

November 26, 2014

Happy ThanksgivingThanksgiving is all about food and family. Many of us consider our pets family members and want to include them in the holiday celebration, but menu selection for pets can be tricky. For example, dogs love chocolate, but it will cause vomiting, diarrhea and hyperactivity if Fido indulges his passion with a few foil wrapped chocolate turkeys. Your cat may find the raw turkey trimmings sitting on the counter a tasty treat. Raw poultry can be teeming with organisms such Salmonella or E. coli and give Fluffy a nasty case of food poisoning. So here are simple suggestions for taking food from your holiday table and creating a healthy and safe buffet for the family pets. More difficult will be figuring out if seating Fido next to Grandpa and Fluffy next to Uncle Ray will provoke a family fracas!

Doggie dishes
When choosing Thanksgiving food for your dog’s dish, stay away from high fat dishes, such as gravy or sausage stuffing, which can provoke an episode of painful pancreatitis. Steer clear of raisins and grapes, whether in a fruit salad or stuffing, as these delicious fruits can cause serious kidney problems. A spoonful each of nice white meat turkey, sweet potatoes or mashed potatoes minus the butter, sour cream, nuts, and marshmallows would be safe turkey day fare for your dog. Fruit often appeals to dogs, and while recreating grandma’s apple crumb pie, save a couple of apple slices for your dog.

Reptile recipes
If you have a vegetarian reptile, such as an iguana, bearded dragon or a tortoise, the Thanksgiving side dishes provide an opportunity to share the bounty of the season.  Winter greens such as collards and mustard greens make a tasty holiday treat. While you’re setting aside the greens for your special scaled friend, save some raw squash, yams and even a few fresh or boiled cranberries to create a colorful and healthy reptile dinner. In addition to the vegetables and fruit, your turtles might like a bit of white or dark meat turkey added to their plate.

Kitty cuisine
Because cats think of you as their servant, dishing up what you believe to be a special holiday meal without asking their permission may result in rejection of your best culinary efforts. Perhaps just serve up the turkey flavor of your cat’s favorite canned cat food and call it a day in the kitchen! If you must cook for your kitty, consider simmering the giblets from the turkey until they are cooked through. Once they are cooled, mince them finely for a feline Thanksgiving Day indulgence.

Pocket pet provisions
If you have a small mammal, such as a rabbit or guinea pig, save some salad fixings, like lettuce leaves and carrot pieces, to make Thanksgiving extra special. While you are making the pie, save a small piece of apple before it is mixed with sugar and cinnamon as a rabbit dessert. The family ferret can feast on small bits of plain turkey meat without gravy or seasonings.

Bird buffet
Before you add the butter, sugar or marshmallows to the steamed or boiled sweet potatoes, save a small portion for your bird’s Thanksgiving dinner. If you garnish your vegetable dishes with pecans, walnuts or slivered almonds, they too can be added to your bird’s holiday fare. Selections from the vegetable side dishes, such as carrot pieces, green beans and Brussels sprouts, make a tasty and healthy addition to your bird’s plate, but be sure to set them aside before butter or salt is added!

The Animal Medical Center wishes a happy Thanksgiving to all! “Bone” Appétit.


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