The 139th Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show: Old and New

February 11, 2015
Coton de Tulear

Coton de Tulear | Photo: AKC

This coming weekend begins the multi-day canine spectacular known as the Westminster Kennel Club (WKC) Dog Show. The annual event is the second oldest continuous sporting event in the United States, ranking number two to the Kentucky Derby, one year its senior. Dog lovers can spend Valentine’s Day watching the second annual Master’s Agility Competition at Westminster or meeting over 100 different purebred dogs at the AKC Meet the Breeds show. The WKC Show takes place Monday and Tuesday, February 16 and 17. Daytime events are at Piers 92 and 94 (711 12th Avenue at 55th Street). The evening events, Best of Group and Best in Show, can be seen at Madison Square Garden where the Show has been held for 139 years.

Every Year Beau-tee-ful Dogs!
Nothing new here. The WKC Show will feature nearly 3,000 gorgeous dogs, at least one dog representing each of the American Kennel Club’s (AKC) 184 registered breeds. Leading the pack in terms of numbers are America’s family dogs, the Golden Retriever with 58 entries and Labrador Retrievers with 56. The breed represented by the fewest number of entrants is the Norwegian Lundehund with one ‘lone wolf’ entrant. These truly are rare dogs; I checked The Animal Medical Center’s (AMC) 57,638 dog registrations and found only three Norwegian Lundehunds. This Norse breed features six toes on each foot and a neck so flexible, the top of their head can touch their back, both advantageous adaptations for hunting puffins on the icy slopes of Norway. Like most Artic breeds, they have a thick coat to help them withstand frigid temperatures.

New Breeds at the Show
The list of 184 AKC breeds includes two breeds newly recognized by the American Kennel Club that will be seen at Westminster for the first time: the Coton de Tulear in the Non-Sporting Group and the Wirehaired Vizsla in the Sporting Group. The veterinarians at The AMC know the Coton well as they are popular pets in NYC and we have 145 of them as patients. Since the Wirehaired Vizsla was not imported to the United States until the 1970s, they are not well known. Seeing the Wirehaired Vizslas at the WKC Show will be a special treat since none of these Hungarian hunting dogs have been seen as patients at The AMC.

New Arrivals for 2016
We already know that next year there will be four new breeds ready for participation in the 2016 WKC Show: the Spanish Water Dog, the Cirneco dell’Etna, the Bergamasco and the Boerboel. Except for the Spanish Water Dog, the list appears to be more like a spelling bee challenge than names of dogs!

As Always, The AMC Will Be There
The AMC’s veterinarians will be in attendance for emergency care at both the Piers and the Garden from Saturday until the 2015 Best in Show is named. The AMC will also have an information booth at Meet the Breeds on Saturday (Booth #131 Pier 92) and at the WKC Show on Monday and Tuesday (#44 Pier 94). Please stop by and say hello.


Hound’s Tooth and Cat’s Teeth: A Photo Blog in Honor of National Pet Dental Health Month

February 4, 2015

Why Your Veterinarian Goes Crazy for a Urine Sample from Your Pet

January 28, 2015

pet urine sampleWhile it is not unusual for a pet to have an accident in The Animal Medical Center waiting room or while standing on an examination table, my reaction to that accident may be considered unusual. As the embarrassed pet family is grabbing for a paper towel or a tissue to mop up, I blurt out “stop” so I can get a syringe to collect the urine for analysis in the laboratory.

18 Tests in One Tube
At The Animal Medical Center, a urinalysis tests 18 different parameters from just a teaspoon of urine. Some of the parameters are assessed visually, like color and clarity. A special dipstick measures six values simultaneously – especially important here are glucose and ketones – indicators of potential diabetes. The urine is spun in a centrifuge and the material that collects on the bottom of the test tube is specially stained and evaluated under the microscope. Finally, a drop or two of urine is placed on a refractometer, a device that measures the specific gravity and assesses how concentrated the urine is.

A Snapshot of Your Pet’s Health
The results from tests performed on that teaspoon of urine I have collected off the table or floor gives me a whole lot of information about your pet’s health. The finding of red and white blood cells and bacteria when the urine is evaluated under the microscope suggests a urinary tract infection. Observation of crystals in the urine is common and may not represent disease, but if your pet has bladder stones, the presence of crystals gives a hint as to the type of stones, and knowing the type of stone makes treatment more specific and successful. For example, the presence of ammonium biurate crystals in a dog with bladder stones suggests the presence of an abnormal liver blood vessel, and the presence of struvite crystals in a dog with a urinary tract infection and bladder stones suggests struvite stones. In addition to filtering the blood to remove waste products from the body, the kidneys help maintain the body’s water balance. Drink too much and they excrete the excess, drink too little and they hang on to every molecule of water they can. When the kidneys don’t work well, they lose the ability to dilute and concentrate the urine. Measurement of a urine specific gravity, part of a routine urine test, helps veterinarians assess the kidney’s ability to dilute and concentrate and is a partial measure of kidney health.

So much information from something you, the pet owner thought was just an accident. No wonder I am crazy about getting that urine sample from your pet.


Baby, It’s Cold Outside: Winter Tips for Pet Owners

January 21, 2015

Is Chronic Kidney Disease the Same as Chronic Renal Failure?

January 14, 2015

chronic renal failure chronic kidney disease

One of @amcny’s Twitter followers posted the question that is the title of this post. This person also asked, “Should the high end of the normal range of creatinine be 2.4?” These are very good questions, especially for cat families since cats are seven times more likely to have kidney disease than dogs. I am devoting this week’s blog to the answers.

Kidney Tests
A standard panel of blood tests includes measurement of blood urea nitrogen and creatinine. These tests are commonly used to evaluate kidney function, but the results can be abnormal with dehydration, intestinal bleeding and a high protein diet. When combined with a physical examination and an analysis of the pet’s urine, they become a more powerful assessment of how well the kidneys work.

For many years, when veterinarians discovered elevations in blood tests to measure kidney function, we talked with pet families about chronic renal failure or CRF, and before that we talked about chronic interstitial nephritis or CIN. Today we more commonly use the term chronic kidney disease or CKD. As time passed, the name has changed to more correctly reflect our understanding of the disease. Chronic interstitial nephritis comes from microscopic evaluation of a kidney biopsy, something most pets never have. Chronic renal failure was a confusing term to pet owners who were unfamiliar with the medical term for kidney – renal. Failure was a misnomer since the abnormal blood tests indicate decreased function, but not necessarily an absence of function or failure. Thus, renal became kidney and failure was swapped out for disease.

If There is Chronic, There is Also Acute
In medicine, if a disease has the modifier “chronic” you can bet there is also an ”acute” form of the same disease. Acute renal failure has a very abrupt onset in a decline of kidney function and is caused by a variety of disorders including leptospirosis, antifreeze ingestion and lily intoxication. Some pets with acute renal failure completely recover; others improve but continue to have chronic kidney disease and sadly, others don’t make it. The term chronic indicates a long term process that may or may not get worse, but one that, with treatment, can achieve a good quality of life.

Is 2.4 the High End of Normal Range for Creatinine?
Normal range is another term largely gone from the veterinary lexicon because normal depends on the age, sex and even breed of the dogs or cats used for comparison. Now we use the term “reference range or reference interval.” The upper end of the reference range is variable from lab to lab, based on testing methodology, equipment and the exact animals used to develop it. Perhaps more important than the exact reference range from the lab is what is normal for your pet, i.e. what was the creatinine last year and the year before and is the number trending upwards? When that happens, it suggests decreased kidney function and suggests more testing may be indicated.

Thank you to our Twitter follower for asking such important questions. If you are interested in more information about what blood tests tell your veterinarian about your pet’s health, read this recent blog on blood testsLearn more about feline kidney disease.


Five Tips for Keeping Your Pet’s Weight Loss Resolution

January 7, 2015

Since New Year’s has passed, I suspect many pet families are hard at work on their list of resolutions. Weight loss is a common human New Year’s resolution and since estimates of overweight and obese pets range from 25-40%, I suspect it is on the list of many pet families as well. If you have a Labrador Retriever, Beagle, Cocker Spaniel, Basset Hound, Dachshund or Sheltie, breeds at high risk for obesity, weight loss is probably perpetually on your to do list.

Here are my tips to help your pet keep its resolve when it comes to weight loss:

  1. Many pet owners don’t recognize chubbiness in their favorite furry friend. Have your veterinarian assess your pet’s body condition score. This will help determine if weight loss is necessary.

    weight loss for pets

    Pet Body Condition Score Chart

  2. Using your pet’s body condition score, decide how much weight loss is necessary and have your veterinarian calculate the number of calories required daily to attain that weight. Ask if a weight loss food would be nutritionally better than simply cutting back on the current daily portion.
  3. Determine how many calories are in each can, bag or box of your pet’s food and calculate exactly how many ounces, grams or portions of a can are required to meet your pet’s daily calorie allotment. Then feed that number of calories – no more, no less.
  4. Limit treats to 10% of the calculated daily calorie allotment AND include treats in the daily calorie total. Treats can look deceptively calorie free and help to pack on the pounds. A small Milk Bone biscuit contains 20 calories and a Bully Stix has up to 22 calories per inch. A six inch stick could be nearly 25% of your 30 pound dog’s calorie allotment for the day.
  5. Keep your pet active. Throw a ball. Use the laser pointer with your cat. Exercise with your pet. Scientific research has shown exercising your dog is good for those on both ends of the leash.

Here are more weight loss suggestions for pets.

Let’s clink our glasses of no calorie seltzer water to a healthy, happy and thinner 2015 for the whole family!


Veterinary Year in Review: 2014

December 31, 2014

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