What Does a Vet Tech Do?

October 8, 2014

Fifty Years of Postgraduate Education: A Look Back

June 18, 2014

50 years of postgraduate educationThe next two weeks at The Animal Medical Center mark an important milestone for the institution, veterinary medicine and pets everywhere. On June 24th, we are celebrating the graduation of the 50th class of veterinary interns. Earlier this week, we welcomed the 51st intern class at our annual White Coat Ceremony.

Over the past 50 years, more than 1,200 veterinarians have completed a formal internship at The AMC and many have gone on to become leaders in our profession. Today, AMC-trained veterinarians work in all facets of veterinary medicine including teaching, research and clinical practice. The first intern class graduated in 1965 and consisted of three men and one woman. The members of this class embody the mission of The AMC: teaching, research and clinical service. Dr. Daryl Biery retired as a professor of radiology from The University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Stephen Ettinger is best known for his Textbook of Veterinary Internal Medicine, now in its seventh edition, and Dr. William DeHoff founded MedVet, a specialty hospital which was just named “Hospital of the Year” by the American Animal Hospital Association. The first class was also the smallest class to graduate. The largest class graduated 31 years later and had 35 members.

Training the Leaders of Tomorrow
Currently there are over 50 AMC-trained veterinarians who are members of the faculty at colleges of veterinary medicine throughout the world, and another 30 who have retired from their faculty positions. These numbers do not include a handful of AMC-trained veterinarians who serve as veterinary academic leaders such as deans, associate deans and program administrators, such as Dr. Mark StetterDr. Rodney PageDr. Claudia KirkDr. Robert Mason, and Dr. Joseph Taboada. I would venture to say nearly every AMC alumnus has, at one time or another, helped to train a future veterinarian when they have taken a young aspiring veterinarian under their wing and into their practice.

Discovering Knowledge for the Future
Part of The AMC’s mission is the discovery of new knowledge through research into naturally occurring disease. This month’s scientific publications in veterinary medicine highlight that mission through the publications of AMC alumni. In the current issues of the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, the Journal of the American Animal Hospital Association and the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, there are eight publications by AMC-trained veterinarians. These topics include the equine athlete, canine urinary tract infections, polyarthropathy, and the minimum clinical database. There are two articles each on feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and lymphoma. In the past, AMC alumni were instrumental in identifying feline taurine deficiency cardiomyopathy, West Nile Virus infections in the United States, hepatic copper toxicosis in Bedlington terriers and techniques to repair kneecaps in dogs.

Saving Animals Every Day
The accomplishments listed above are noteworthy, groundbreaking and important to the veterinary profession, however most graduates of AMC training programs are like me, providing medical, surgical and preventive healthcare for animals of all species, day in and day out. Some of us are specialists and others are your favorite neighborhood veterinarian, but we all love to celebrate a new puppy, reflect on the life of a 19 year old cat, piece together a fractured bone, or put cancer into remission.

So, happy 50th birthday to AMC’s Postgraduate Education program, congratulations to this year’s graduating class and welcome to the incoming class of interns. Click here to see an extensive list of the accomplishments of AMC alumni.


Hurricane Sandy: The Animal Medical Center Story

October 31, 2012

The view down E. 62nd Street on Monday night

By Sunday night, the Governor and Mayor had shut down all mass transit in NYC, our schools were already closed for Monday, and by Monday morning even the New York Stock Exchange suspended trading for the day. New York City was silent; everyone was indoors and the wind and rain of Hurricane Sandy had not yet arrived. Despite all the closures, The Animal Medical Center was open for business as usual.

As far back as anyone can remember, The AMC has never closed. We mean it when we say we are open 24/7. When a disaster is anticipated, the staff work together to determine how best to cover shifts and maintain adequate nursing and medical expertise for our patients. During blackouts, natural disasters, and human disasters, our staff comes to work prepared. Many employees came to work on Sunday with food, clothes, and bedding, planning to stay for the duration of the storm. The AMC stores inflatable beds for those employees sleeping at the hospital. The beds got blown up Monday afternoon since the electricity fluttered on and off during the day. Lucky for us, our favorite deli and neighborhood diner were still open.

It was a good thing we were open for business, as really sick animals needed care. Here is a sampling of the Sunday night admission list: a stray cat and a stray dog were brought to The AMC since the shelters were closed for the night; Harley, a cat, came in with complications of diabetes; Lexi, a bulldog, was admitted for serious vomiting; Gus the cat developed heart failure; Monkey, a Pekingese, required an emergency MRI and back surgery; a golden retriever named Aristotle became unconscious and he too required an emergency MRI ; Rysiu was admitted for feline bladder stones resulting in a urinary blockage. On Monday, he had an urgent surgery to remove the stones.

Visits to our emergency room were steady on Monday morning, but most scheduled patients cancelled their visits. The ER continued accepting patients overnight, even though there was at one point a foot of water in the first floor lobby. Our power went out from about 10 p.m. until 1 a.m., during which time our generator kicked in to run essential electrical equipment. Once the high tide began to recede, the lobby was squeegeed dry and, except for internet service that was slow to be restored, we were back to normal. The banners on the north side of the building are in tatters and our awning has a rip, but these are cosmetic only and we feel very fortunate to only be slightly damp around the edges.

New York pets were fortunate, too. For the second hurricane in a row, pets were allowed in evacuation shelters and in his Monday press conference, Mayor Bloomberg announced 73 pets had already been accepted into shelters.

Find more information about Hurricane Sandy and pets here.

For help in planning for the next disaster, click here.


What to Expect When You’re Expecting Puppies

December 6, 2011

Last week I switched hats for a few days and was more an obstetrician than an oncologist. One of my friend’s dogs, a Jack Russell Terrier named Tallulah, had puppies.

Planned Parenthood
This was a planned litter of puppies, all of which already have good homes. When Tallulah came into heat, we measured her blood levels of progesterone so she could meet the father dog at the optimal time for successful mating.

Getting the Good News
Unlike humans, there is no blood test to determine pregnancy in a dog. Ultrasound can detect a pregnancy 24 days after conception. Most dog pregnancies are diagnosed by palpation about 26-32 days after conception. The veterinarian can palpate swellings lined up like a string of pearls in the mother dog’s uterus – each swelling represents one tiny, growing puppy. Tallulah, being a willful terrier, would not let me feel her abdomen long enough to be sure, so we did an ultrasound to confirm there would be puppies coming around Thanksgiving. Here, you can see what we saw on ultrasound – puppies 3 and 4.

Just What the Doctor Ordered
Because this was a planned litter of puppies, Tallulah was vaccinated long before she was pregnant, and she was dewormed too. Because small dogs are prone to low calcium levels from pregnancy and nursing, once I was sure she was pregnant, I prescribed a puppy food high in calories and calcium and tasty vitamins as well.

Predicting the Big Day
Pregnancy lasts approximately 65 days in dogs. An x-ray is commonly used to determine the number of puppies to expect. See if you can count the five puppies on Tallulah’s x-ray.

Eight to 24 hours prior to delivering, a pregnant dog’s rectal temperature will precipitously drop. Tuesday morning, before Thanksgiving, Tallulah’s temperature dropped and she began shivering. By 4:30 am the next morning, there were five little female Jack Russell Terriers! Delivery took just under two hours. See a video of the new family below:

 

Organizing a Puppy Layette
Puppies don’t have nearly the requirements for clothes, beds, rockers and bouncy chairs as human babies. Tallulah needed a comfortable, clean and safe place to deliver her puppies. I have found a kiddie pool works well. The sides are high enough for Tallaulah to jump in and out, but keep the puppies corralled.

Pampering the New Mother
Mother dogs are totally focused on caring for and protecting their new pups. Tallulah hardly wanted to leave them long enough to go outside to urinate or defecate. Her food and water were close by the kiddie pool so she could eat and drink with the puppies nearby.

Although everyone wanted to visit the puppies, some new mothers may not feel comfortable having her family displayed and won’t want her puppies handled by strangers until they are bigger. In fact, Tallulah growled and snapped at her dog sister when she came anywhere near the puppies, but was fine for her human family to hold the puppies.

All five girls are doing well and you can see two of the fat, sleepy puppies to the left.

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This may also be found in the “Tales from the Pet Clinic” blog on WebMD.com.

For over a century, The Animal Medical Center has been a national leader in animal health care, known for its expertise, innovation and success in providing routine, specialty and emergency medical care for companion animals. Thanks in part to the enduring generosity of donors, The AMC is also known for its outstanding teaching, research and compassionate community funds. Please help us to continue these efforts. Send your contribution to: The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd Street, New York, NY 10065. For more information, visit www.amcny.org. To make an appointment, please call 212.838.7053.


Occupy Wall Street: Parvovirus Strikes Demonstrating Dogs

December 1, 2011

The Occupy Wall Street (OWS) demonstration has been front and center in the news over the past six weeks. Until now, the news has been about humans, but recently the dogs of OWS have hit the newswire due to a parvovirus outbreak at the San Francisco encampment.

Parvovirus in Dogs
Parvovirus is a contagious gastrointestinal disease affecting dogs.

Infection can be fatal at worst and cause serious illness at best. Parvovirus is not a subtle disease: it is associated with the most severe cases of diarrhea and vomiting we veterinarians recognize in canine patients. Because the virus attacks rapidly growing cells, the bone marrow cells producing white blood cells are depleted, decreasing the white blood cell count and putting dogs at risk of contracting a serious infection on top of the severe diarrhea and vomiting.

Panleukopenia is the Feline Parvovirus
The dogs of OWS are not the only ones at risk for contracting parvovirus infection. Any dog coming in contact with the feces of a parvovirus infected dog is at risk, unless they are protected by vaccination. Cats have their own version of parvovirus – the panleukopenia virus. Infection by the panleukopenia virus results in similar clinical signs in infected cats as parvovirus infection causes in dogs. Fortunately, panleukopenia rarely occurs in my practice, but the few cases I have seen could not be saved. Vaccination protects against this frequently fatal feline viral infection. Veterinarians consider vaccinations against parvovirus and panleukopenia virus “core” vaccines, meaning these are vaccines nearly all pets should receive.

Close quarters with limited sanitation like OWS are the perfect place for an outbreak of a contagious disease and it would not surprise me to see an outbreak of canine influenza, kennel cough or intestinal parasites at an OWS camp.

Pet Owner Precautions
Pet owners taking their dog or cat to a location where it will come in contact with many other animals should first check with their veterinarian to confirm their pet has been adequately vaccinated. Cats boarding at a kennel for the holidays, dogs attending obedience classes or doggie day care, or any pet demonstrating as part of OWS have an increased risk of contracting an infectious disease simply due to increased exposure to other animals. Pet owners should keep their healthy pets away from other animals with signs of illness such as coughing, sneezing, vomiting or diarrhea to help protect them against contracting a life-threatening illness.

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This may also be found in the “Tales from the Pet Clinic” blog on WebMD.com.

For over a century, The Animal Medical Center has been a national leader in animal health care, known for its expertise, innovation and success in providing routine, specialty and emergency medical care for companion animals. Thanks in part to the enduring generosity of donors, The AMC is also known for its outstanding teaching, research and compassionate community funds. Please help us to continue these efforts. Send your contribution to: The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd Street, New York, NY 10065. For more information, visit www.amcny.org. To make an appointment, please call 212.838.7053.


Diabetes: A Serious Disease for You and Your Pet

November 25, 2011

November is American Diabetes Month. According to the American Diabetes Association, a person is diagnosed with diabetes every 17 seconds, and annually the disease kills more Americans than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Diabetes also affects dogs and cats, but there are differences in the manifestations of the disease between the species.

My patient Charity has had diabetes since 2005. At that time, she was overweight and developed the most common form of diabetes in cats, Type II diabetes (non-insulin dependent diabetes). She still required insulin injections because uncontrolled high blood sugar caused a decrease in insulin levels due to the toxic effects of glucose on pancreatic insulin production. Although Charity is a female cat, neutered male cats with a sedentary lifestyle who become obese have a four times greater likelihood of developing diabetes. Genetics seem to play only a small role in the development of feline diabetes, most notably in the Burmese cats in Australia and the United Kingdom.

Type I diabetes (insulin-dependent diabetes) is the form most commonly found in dogs. Concurrent diseases such as obesity and hyperadenocorticism (Cushing’s disease) play a role in the development of diabetes in the dog. Since certain breeds such as Australian terriers, schnauzers and bichon frises are at greater risk of developing diabetes, genetics are believed to play a role in canine diabetes.

Treatment of diabetes in both dogs and cats almost always requires insulin injections. Insulin therapy, weight loss and a high-protein diet corrects the diabetic condition in some lucky cats. Charity lost four pounds following a diet change and insulin therapy, but her diabetes did not go into remission and still requires insulin injections six years later. For those pet owners who give insulin (or use needles at home to administer any medication), the syringes and needles must be properly disposed of to prevent injury to family members. The Food and Drug Administration has just developed a website for safe disposal of needles and sharps.

Hallmark signs of diabetes in dogs and cats include:

-Increased thirst

  • Dogs may start drinking from strange places like the toilet or puddles in the yard. Most cats drink very little water, and if your cat becomes diabetic, you may actually need to refill the water bowl.

-Increased urinations

  • For dogs this may manifest as accidents in the house. If you accidentally walk in a puddle of urine, it may seem sticky since it will be loaded with sugar. For cats, you may notice a litter box flooded with urine

-Weight loss despite a good appetite

If your pet is overweight, prevent diabetes by getting them into an ideal body condition through diet and exercise recommended by your veterinarian. If you recognize any signs of diabetes, see your veterinarian immediately.

For additional information on diabetes in pets, try the dLife video archives.

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This may also be found in the “Tales from the Pet Clinic” blog on WebMD.com.

For over a century, The Animal Medical Center has been a national leader in animal health care, known for its expertise, innovation and success in providing routine, specialty and emergency medical care for companion animals. Thanks in part to the enduring generosity of donors, The AMC is also known for its outstanding teaching, research and compassionate community funds. Please help us to continue these efforts. Send your contribution to: The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd Street, New York, NY 10065. For more information, visit http://www.amcny.org. To make an appointment, please call 212.838.7053.


Fall Flu Season and Your Pets

November 7, 2011

Fall is here, and with fall comes the flu. Every fall our physicians urge us to be vaccinated against the flu to protect our family members and ourselves from contracting or spreading this year’s flu virus.

What about our pets? Why didn’t I start this post urging you to take your pet to the veterinarian for its annual flu shot? That is because, unlike the human influenza viruses, canine influenza’s occurrence is not seasonal. So, anytime is the right time to vaccinate your pet against this highly contagious disease. I have answered some commonly asked questions I receive during flu season.

What is Canine Influenza?
Canine influenza is a new disease which was first identified in Florida in 2003. It mutated from a horse influenza virus to an influenza virus infecting dogs. Canine influenza is now found nationwide.

Is my dog at risk for contracting Canine Flu?
Dogs at risk for canine influenza infection are social dogs, such as those that go to doggie day care, dog parks, dog shows or a boarding kennel — anytime of the year. If your dog is a social dog, a vaccine has recently been developed to protect against canine influenza, and your veterinarian will know if it is right for your dog. The protocol for vaccination is two doses of vaccine given two weeks apart, followed by annual revaccination.

What about cats? I have heard about a Feline “Flu.”
Feline flu is a misnomer. Frequently called feline flu, feline herpes virus and feline calicivirus infections are not caused by an influenza virus and are not technically “flu.” No influenza virus has been identified in cats, but the clinical signs associated with herpes virus and calicivirus infection can look very similar to flu in humans. Even though cats don’t have their own influenza virus, vaccinating them against herpes and calicivirus will help keep them healthy and limit the impact of upper respiratory viruses on their health.

Can my dog or cat catch the flu when I am under the weather?
Feeling sick? Thinking cuddling with your cat or dog will make you feel better? Wrong. Cats and dog can contract human flu. When you have the flu, quarantine yourself from all members of your family, including your pets.

If you must touch your pet while you are sick or prepare their food, be sure to wash your hands before doing so. Cover your coughs and sneezes to keep everyone else in the family healthy, including the pets.

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This may also be found in the “Tales from the Pet Clinic” blog on WebMD.com.

For over a century, The Animal Medical Center has been a national leader in animal health care, known for its expertise, innovation and success in providing routine, specialty and emergency medical care for companion animals. Thanks in part to the enduring generosity of donors, The AMC is also known for its outstanding teaching, research and compassionate community funds. Please help us to continue these efforts. Send your contribution to: The Animal Medical Center, 510 East 62nd Street, New York, NY 10065. For more information, visit http://www.amcny.org. To make an appointment, please call 212.838.7053.


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