Resources for Summer Pet Travel

June 4, 2014

traveling dogMemorial Day has passed, school will soon end, and then comes the annual family summer vacation–an event which now more than ever before includes the family pet. Because pets are not always welcome at hotels, parks and on public transportation, planning ahead for your furry friend will help make your summer vacation memorable for fun and not for travel headaches. Here are some tips and websites to help you plan the perfect pet holiday.

General Travel Tips
For a good overview of traveling with pets, try one of these sites:

Public Transportation
During the busy travel months of summer, finding a parking spot for your car can be difficult, making public transportation especially attractive. Petsweekly.com gives information on pet travel on trains and buses

Parks and Recreation
America’s National Parks have been called “our best idea” because they preserve the most spectacular natural wonders for all Americans, except pets. Because of their fragile ecosystems and the risk to pets’ safety from large predators such as coyotes, pets are only welcome in a limited number of National ParksPetfriendlytravel.com has information on the accessibility of state parks throughout the country.

Pet Friendly Hotels
Westin Hotels, W Hotels, Kimpton Hotels and a number of other hotel chains advertise pet friendly rooms. Be sure when you make a reservation to request a pet friendly room and also inquire about additional charges to have the pet stay in your room.

International Travel
Taking your pet on an international vacation requires the investigative powers of Sherlock Holmes and better planning than the D-day invasion of Normandy. Start your investigation with the United States Department of Agriculture’s website.

Pay close attention to the rules for export (taking your pet out of the USA) and import (getting your pet back into the USA). Also check the website of the country you plan to travel to on your vacation. Every country’s entry requirements for pets are different and your pet may need special paperwork, blood tests or vaccinations months in advance of the trip. If your trip stems from a job-related relocation, you may want to use a professional pet shipper to help you interpret and follow the travel guidelines. For more information about international travel with your pets, read our archived blog.

Here’s to safe travels for you and your four-footed companions this summer!


Is Your Dog Down in the Dumps?

May 29, 2014

depressed dogRecently, I answered questions from a New York Times science writer who inquired about depression in dogs for an article she was writing. The short article received a lot of attention, so I decided to expand on the topic for my readers.

Dogs Have Feelings Too
Depression is a specific psychiatric diagnosis in humans. If you look at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) definition of depression, many of the symptoms of depression cannot be applied to dogs, since they revolve around feelings. While we believe dogs have feelings, they cannot articulate sadness, helplessness, pessimism or suicidal thoughts as would humans suffering from clinical depression.

Yet, there are some signs of depression in dogs similar to those experienced by humans. Their owners may notice abrupt changes in behavior including irritability, loss of interest in activities, decreased energy and changes in appetite, all of which may signify depression. Dog owners frequently report these symptoms in their dog when a child in the family goes away to college, a favorite human or animal family member dies or the family moves to a new home. But because these are non-specific findings, they could be attributed to medical conditions as well. So it is wise to bring your pet to a veterinarian whenever you see behavioral changes in order to rule out illness.

Depression Means Two Things
Because veterinarians use the term “depression” in a different way than physicians do about their patients, some pet owners may misunderstand a diagnosis of depression. Veterinarians use “depressed” to describe one of five levels of consciousness in their four-legged patients:

  1. Normal. Of course there are many variations of normal between pets of the same breed. Veterinarians will require input from owners to determine if the pet is behaving in its normal manner.
  2. Depressed, dull, quiet. These pets prefer to sleep and have responses to stimuli that are appropriate. Animals diagnosed with a disease may be dull quiet, or depressed. A thorough examination of a pet with these signs and symptoms is required to rule out behavior resulting from a change in environment or illness.
  3. Disoriented, demented. This is similar to a dull animal, but responses to stimuli are inappropriate. Pets may be hyperactive, hysterical or irritable.
  4. Stuporous, obtunded. These pets do not respond to normal stimuli but will respond to strong, noxious stimuli such as a toe pinch.
  5. Comatose. These pets are unresponsive to all stimuli.

Not Just Depression
The NIH says depression in humans is often associated with other mental health disorders such as anxiety, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), phobias and obsessive compulsive disorders. Veterinarians do diagnose obsessive compulsive disorders, PTSD, aggression, separation anxiety, and noise phobia (commonly fear of thunderstorms) in dogs and urine spraying and predatory aggression in cats. These disorders are commonly treated with antidepressants and behavioral modification therapy, suggesting depression may also be associated with these other mental health disorders in pets.

Antidepressants for Your Dog and Cat
Some of the antidepressants veterinarians use in pets include:

  • Clomipramine [Clomicalm®] is approved by the FDA for treatment of separation anxiety in dogs.
  • Fluoxetine [Reconcile®] is approved by the FDA for treatment of separation anxiety in dogs and contains the same active ingredient as Prozac®.
  • Selegiline (L-deprenyl) [Anipryl®] is approved by the FDA for treatment of cognitive dysfunction in dogs.
  • Nortriptyline, amitriptyline [Elavil®] and doxepin are not FDA approved for use in dogs or cats, but are frequently prescribed by veterinarians “off-label.”

If your pooch is punky or your cat is catatonic, it is important to find out the cause. Have them checked by their veterinarian immediately.


10 Warning Signs of Cancer in Pets

May 21, 2014

Is a Cat Bite Worse than a Dog Bite?

May 14, 2014

The feline dental arcade on the left shows the sharp fangs responsible for serious injury from cat bites. The photo on the right shows the blunter, less tapered fangs of a dog.

cat and dog teeth

Feline and canine teeth

May 18-24 is Dog Bite Prevention Week. Once again the cat is ignored, possibly since cat bites are less common than dog bites. But cat bites are a serious problem and should not be disregarded. In New York City, 17% of animal bites injuries seen in emergency rooms are from cats and over 70% from dogs.

Animal bites are a significant public health issue. Every year 4.5 million Americans are bitten by dogs and 150,000 of these people require medical attention. Children ages five to nine and males, regardless of age, are more commonly involved in dog bite incidents than adults and females. Dog bite injuries to children less than four years of age typically involve a bite to the head.

Cats, being a completely different beast than dogs, cause different types of bite injuries than dogs do. Dog bites may look worse, because their teeth are larger, but the slender, sharp fangs of a cat penetrate deeply into the tissues. Cat bites are more likely to introduce bacteria deep into the wound, causing serious infection and damage to tendons and ligaments. In a recent Mayo Clinic study, one third of patients bitten on the hand by a cat were hospitalized and two thirds of those patients needed surgery to treat the bite injury. Middle-aged women were the most common victims of cat bites to the hand.

Because children love dogs, teaching them safe behavior around dogs is important. Using common sense and a little practice of appropriate behavior around dogs, children can safely interact with dogs. This Saturday, May 17th, The Animal Medical Center is hosting PAW Day, its annual pet health fair for families and their pets, from 10:00am – 1:00pm in Carl Schurz Park at 84th Street and East End Avenue, where your child can practice interacting with dogs. This free community awareness event will include a children’s area with Clifford the Big Red Dog, face painting, pet safety information, a stuffed animal vet clinic and much more!

 

PAW Day banner


Bad Back, Good Friends

May 7, 2014
Tiko

Tiko

Tiko (right) first came to The Animal Medical Center after Reynaldo noticed his little buddy was not quite right. Over two days, Tiko lost control of his hind legs, and was referred to The AMC by our neighbors at the Humane Society. Tiko was first seen in The AMC’s ER by Dr. Carly Tichner and she immediately recognized the clinical signs of an intervertebral disc extrusion, colloquially known as a slipped disc. By the time Tiko came to the ER, the slipped disc was not only pressing on his spinal cord and affecting his ability to walk, it was pressing on the nerves giving sensation to his skin. The loss of sensation along a very well defined line in the skin helped Dr. Tichner determine the slipped disc occurred somewhere between the third thoracic vertebra and the third lumbar vertebrae.

Time is of the Essence
The longer a slipped disc goes uncorrected, the greater the damage to the spinal cord and if too much times goes by before the disc pressing on the spinal cord is removed, paralysis can be permanent. The AMC’s second year neurology resident, Dr. Vanessa Biegen, and staff neurologist, Dr. JP McCue, immediately took over Tiko’s case management and within 3 hours of his arrival at The AMC, had the little fellow in The AMC’s MRI machine, and shortly thereafter, onto the operating table to remove the slipped disc. As Dr. Tichner accurately predicted, the MRI identified a slipped disc between the eleventh and twelfth thoracic vertebrae! During the 75 minute surgery, Drs. Biegen and McCue found severe compression and hemorrhage of the spinal cord as a result of the slipped disc.

A Tail Wag = Good News
On afternoon rounds the day after surgery, Tiko wagged his tail for his neurologists and when they examined him, they found he had regained partial ability to move his hind legs! Within 8 weeks, Tiko was 90% back to his old self. To protect his back, Tiko has a new lifestyle – less roughhousing, more resting in his new favorite indoor dog house but according to his family he is once again the totally happy-go-lucky, loving and healthy little guy that he has always been, thanks to the dedicated doctors and staff at The AMC.

Grateful Words
Tiko’s successful surgery and recovery were possible because of the generosity of those who support the Neurology Patient Assistance Fund. Those ill or injured animals like Tiko who benefit from the fund must qualify medically and the pet family must qualify financially to receive this Community Fund-sponsored care. Tiko’s owner summed up his AMC experience this way, “It was definitely one of the toughest weeks I have ever been through, but everyone at The AMC was absolutely amazing. I was immediately impressed and reassured by everyone’s genuine concern for Tiko and knew that he would make it through and be okay. I feel extremely fortunate to have had access to the level of treatment and care provided by The AMC and to have been accepted by the community funds program.”


How Do Dogs’ Noses Work?

April 30, 2014
dog nose

Photo: Mark Watson

Dog noses have been in the news lately. Not just because dogs can sniff out a cracker crumb between the sofa cushions or because dogs smell the new bag of bacon strips through the closed pantry door, but because dog noses are being put to work in a very serious way.

For hundreds of years, dogs, like the Bloodhound, have been employed as search and rescue workers to find missing people after being given a whiff of the missing person’s clothing. Now medical sniffer dogs are being trained to diagnose cancer, detect low blood sugar and predict an epileptic seizure. Several features of dogs’ noses make their sense of smell better than our own.

Bigger is Better
CT scan of a dog's noseCompared to the size of their face, dogs have big noses – well most of them do. And, a bigger nose means they have more area for smell receptors. Inside the nasal passages, the dog has ruffles of tissue called turbinates which increase the surface area that accommodates their smell receptors. Compared to our 5 million, dogs have 300 million receptors on their nasal turbinates. The CT scan on the right shows the ruffles of tissue inside a dog’s nasal passages, and if you watch our video, you can see what turbinates actually look like when a rhinoscopy (nasal endoscopy) is performed.

Bidirectional Smelling
Take a look at your dog’s nose. Notice the nostrils have slits on the sides and the openings are a bit more to the side than directly out front. These features give your dog’s sense of smell directionality. New smells come in from the front and old smells go out through the side slits with exhalation, allowing new smells to constantly bathe the smell receptors.

More Brain Power
Because dogs’ sense of smell is their most highly developed sense, they devote an enormous amount of brain power to the act of smelling. Compared to our rudimentary sense of smell, there is 40 times more canine brain power dedicated to smelling, which allows dogs to differentiate 30,000 to 100,000 different smells. Our repertoire of smells is only 4,000 to 10,000 different smells.

For more about these scent-sitive dogs, watch my interview on Fox5 News with Liz Dahlem.


Hairball Awareness Day 2014

April 23, 2014

This Friday, April 25, 2014 is Hairball Awareness Day. Most of us think of hairballs left for us by our pet cats as an annoyance, found typically between the bedroom and the bathroom. Their peak occurrence is somewhere around 3am and appear only when you have bare feet. As annoying as hairballs are to us, to pets they can actually cause a surgical emergency. Here to prove it is my patient Toby.

Toby clipped

Toby after having his fur clipped

Toby is an eight year old long-haired cat, but in this photo you can see he has been clipped, thanks to a hairball emergency. The second photo shows him with a full coat. Toby’s story starts with a voice change and trouble breathing. In addition, his owner noticed Toby had not been eating well and was not grooming himself. A visit to The Animal Medical Center emergency room found a tumor on his larynx. Ultimately Toby’s diagnosis was lymphoma of the larynx, readily explaining his voice change and respiratory difficulties. Because the tumor was also obstructing the opening to his esophagus, a soft food diet was prescribed, instead of his normal crunchy hairball prevention formula.

Toby at home

Toby at home

A few days later, Toby started chemotherapy. Within days he could meow, was breathing and eating well and resumed his normal grooming routine. But just before his fourth chemotherapy treatment, Toby vomited up a six inch long hairball and initially seemed to be fine, however, on the day of his chemotherapy appointment, he vomited twice and we began to worry about a hairball obstruction since Toby seemed painful when we examined his abdomen. An abdominal ultrasound confirmed the presence of a hairball obstruction. Surgeons at The AMC discovered a hairball blocking his small intestine and removed it. Toby recovered uneventfully and resumed chemotherapy once he recovered from surgery.

Today, Toby is back on his hairball prevention diet, has completed chemotherapy and is enjoying a complete remission of his cancer. Whenever we sedate him to evaluate his larynx, we clip his fur to prevent another hairball emergency.

How to avoid a hairball crisis in your pet:

  • Feed your pet food or treats designed to move hairballs efficiently through the intestine.
  • Brush, brush and brush your pet daily.
  • Use a deshedding tool to efficiently remove loose hairs before your pet swallows them.
  • Use caution when removing hair mats as scissors can cut the underlying skin if the mat is tightly adhered.
  • Consider a professional grooming if your pet is severely matted.

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